Things tagged 'consultations'

limited to the area of Barnet Cyclists:

13 issues found for 'consultations':

  • New London Plan 2017

    Created by Simon Munk // 1 thread

    London.gov.uk says:

    What is the new London Plan?
    The London Plan is one of the most important documents for this city.
    It's a strategic plan which shapes how London evolves and develops. All planning decisions should follow London Plan policies, and it sets a policy framework for local plans across London.
    The current 2016 consolidation Plan is still the adopted Development Plan. However the Draft London Plan is a material consideration in planning decisions. It gains more weight as it moves through the process to adoption, however the weight given to it is a matter for the decision maker.

    Consultation on the draft London Plan
    Consultation on this plan is open. Comments will be publicly available. After the consultation, comments are reviewed by an inspector and you may be called in to discuss comments at the Examination in Public.

    What is an Examination in Public?
    At the end of the consultation period your comments will be reviewed by the independent Planning Inspector appointed by the Secretary of State to carry out the Examination in Public for the London Plan.
    You may be invited to discuss your comments at the Examination in Public. All comments will be made available to the public at the end of the consultation period. The legal provisions for the London Plan are in Part VIII of the Greater London Authority (GLA) Act 1999 (as amended) in sections 334 to 341. The Examination in Public is covered in Section 338.

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  • Heavy Goods Vehicles Safety Standard Permit /Direct Vision Standard

    Created by Simon Munk // 1 thread

    Tfl says:

    We have undertaken research that shows that in 2015, Heavy Goods Vehicles (HGVs) were involved in disproportionately high numbers of fatal collisions with cyclists (78 per cent) and pedestrians (20 per cent) on London’s streets, despite only making up four per cent of the overall miles driven in the Capital. The Direct Vision Standard (DVS) forms part of The Mayor, Sadiq Khan and TfL’s Vision Zero approach to reducing road danger. The DVS categorises HGVs on the level of the driver’s direct vision from the cab.

    We consulted earlier this year on the principles of a new DVS. Listening to the feedback from this consultation and working closely with industry and stakeholders we have now further developed this scheme. The Consultation report and Responses to Issues Raised document from this first phase of consultation are available to view in from the links at the bottom of this text. The responses showed that, in general, there is support for the principle of a Direct Vision Standard.

    We are now seeking your views on proposals to introduce a new Safety Standard Permit Scheme as part of DVS which widens our approach beyond direct vision and includes a safe system approach to allow us to address a broader range of road danger risks.

    The proposed scheme would require all HGVs over 12 tonnes to hold a Safety Permit to operate in Greater London from 2020. HGVs will be given a rating between ‘zero-star’ (lowest) and ‘five-star’ (highest). Only those vehicles rated ‘one star’ and above would be allowed to enter of operate in London from 2020. Zero rated vehicles would only be allowed if they can prove compliance through safe system measures. By 2024 only ‘three-star’ rated HGVs and above would automatically be given a Safety Permit. HGVs rated two star and below would need to demonstrate increased safety through progressive safe system measures.

    The safe system could include specific industry recognised measures such as sensors, visual warnings and comprehensive driver training. The Safety Standard Permit scheme would evolve over time, taking into account advances in technology.

    Detailed information about the scheme and the approach in which we have arrived at our current proposals are set out in the consultation document. A full Integrated Impact Assessment is also included.

    The consultation approach
    We are undertaking a phased consultation approach at key stages of the development of the consultation proposals to implement the Direct Vision Standard:

    Phase 1 (24 January to 18 April 2017) – we set out the case for HGV driver direct vision and consulted on the Mayor of London’s outline proposals to introduce a Direct Vision Standard for HGVs in London and the principles of the Standard itself. The responses showed that, in general, there is support for the principle of a Direct Vision Standard.

    Phase 2a – policy consultation (this consultation) – this current phase of consultation seeks views and feedback on the scheme proposals as outlined above and within the supporting consultation document which includes supporting technical reports including the full Integrated Impact Assessment. Feedback from this phase of consultation will be used to develop a second IIA and finalise the scheme proposals to be included in phase 2b of the consultation.

    Phase 2b - Final scheme proposals and statutory consultation (Spring/Summer 2018) – this final phase will consult on the final proposals for the HGV Safety Standard Permit Scheme, including statutory consultation on the appropriate regulatory measure to ban or restrict HGVs in London under the scheme, subject to UK Government and European Commission support and notification.

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  • London Assembly cycling infrastructure investigation

    Created by Simon Munk // 1 thread

    London Assembly says:

    Our investigation
    Over recent years, TfL policy has increasingly focused on the construction of physical cycling infrastructure on London’s roads. A change in direction towards more segregated infrastructure followed our report in 2012 recommending this approach.

    Our investigation will cover the full range of cycling infrastructure in London, with a particular focus on:

    Cycle Superhighways: a form of cycle lane, designed to make cycling safer by helping keep cyclists away from general traffic, and offer direct and continuous cycling on major routes.

    Quietways: a network of cycle routes that link key destinations, improving safety and convenience through small-scale interventions.

    Mini-Hollands: TfL schemes to invest neighbourhood-level improvements in walking and cycling, involving a range of interventions in each area.

    Cycle parking: provision of parking spaces on-street, at stations or in dedicated parking facilities.

    It is important that TfL is able to establish the effectiveness of the infrastructure it installs on London’s roads. We are concerned that to date there has been no comprehensive study of the new infrastructure’s impact on cycling safety, modal share and other road users.

    Questions to answer:

    1. What progress on new cycling infrastructure has been made under Sadiq Khan, and what are his long-term plans?
    2. Has TfL resolved the problems that delayed some cycling schemes under the previous Mayor?
    3. Has segregation delivered the anticipated benefits on the Cycle Superhighways? How many cyclists are using these routes?
    4. To what extent has segregation had negative consequences for other road users and, if necessary, how can this be mitigated?
    5. Have Quietways delivered their anticipated benefits? How many cyclists are using them?
    6. What are the differences in infrastructure between inner and outer London? How can TfL ensure infrastructure in different areas is sufficient and appropriate to the location?
    7. How will TfL’s new ‘Strategic Cycling Analysis’ help determine where and how to invest in infrastructure?
    8. How appropriate is the 400-metre target set in the draft Transport Strategy? Can we equate proximity with access?
    9. Is TfL’s approach to public engagement working effectively to improve scheme designs and meet stakeholder needs?
    10. Are Londoners sufficiently aware of the cycling infrastructure available to them, and how can awareness be increased?
    11. How is TfL using infrastructure to attract a more diverse range of people to cycle in London?
    12. Is there sufficient cycle parking in London, and is it in the right locations?
    13. How are the lessons of the Mini-Hollands and other previous cycling schemes being applied elsewhere?
    14. Should cycling infrastructure be oriented toward longer-distance commuting journeys, or more localised trips?

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  • Kingsbury Town Centre Proposed Public Realm Improvement Scheme

    Henry Lancashire // 1 thread

    Brent Cyclists are preparing a response to this consultation and are seeking comments.

    Brent Council State:
    "In March 2017 Brent Council consulted on Kingsbury Town Centre improvement scheme. Although the proposed improvements were supported, during the consultation period we have received a number of comments and suggestions from local businesses, residents, Ward Councillors, as well as other stakeholders such as London Buses and Brent Cyclists. Based on these comments and suggestions I am pleased to inform you that we have managed to secure additional funding to develop an alternative scheme which addresses these comments and concerns. We are therefore consulting again on the below revised proposals. These proposals align with the aspirations of the Imagine Kingsbury study which set out the community’s vision for improving Kingsbury Town Centre over the next 5 -15 years."

    Previous Consultation on CycleScape: https://www.cyclescape.org/issues/2518-kingsbury-road-proposed-public-realm-improvements-scheme

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  • North Finchley Town Centre Framework Consultation

    Created by JonC // 2 threads

    The Town Centre Framework aims to (amongst other things):

    o create a plan that maximises existing and future movement opportunities including links to nearby stations (Woodside Park and West Finchley), the bus network and pedestrian and cycle connections;

    o achieve well designed, high quality streets, spaces, public realm and buildings, which deliver an appropriate degree of local distinctiveness;

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  • Quieter Neighbourhoods Consultation - Fernleigh Road Area

    Hamish F // 1 thread

    Enfield Council are consulting on these Quieter Neighbourhood treatments for the Fernleigh Road area. They include a 20mph zone supported by road narrowing and road humps, together with other measures to discourage rat-runs: no-left-turns, one way streets and point no entry.

    This residential area is currently affected by through-traffic seeking to avoid sets of traffic lights at Green Lanes/Bourne Hill and Green Lanes/Station Road.

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  • London Assembly investigation: Walking & Cycling at Outer London Junctions

    Created by Simon Munk // 1 thread

    London Assembly says:

    Our investigation
    What different approaches could TfL and London boroughs take to improve junctions and increase walking and cycling in Outer London?

    Small pockets of improvement don’t change the fact that most London streets are dominated by traffic and noise. They are hostile places even to step out into for a pint of milk.

    On behalf of the London Assembly Transport Committee, Caroline Russell AM is investigating how our streets and junctions can become more people-friendly.

    Get involved
    There are a number of specific questions the Committee is seeking to answer. Please address any questions where you have relevant views and information to share, and feel free to cover any other issues you would like the Committee to consider.

    Are there lessons to be learned from previous junction improvements?

    How can we enable more people to walk and cycle?

    How can we make our streets and junctions less hostile to people getting around by bike and on foot?

    How do you get all road users on board?

    Please email transportcommittee@london.gov.uk by August 11 and share the investigation on Twitter using #OuterLondonJunctions

    Key Facts
    The Mayor and TfL are promoting walking and cycling as a form of active travel and a way to reduce health inequalities - however, currently, over 40 percent of Londoners fall short of the recommended 150 minutes of activity per week.

    TfL research has found that people who live in Outer London tend to walk less than those who live in Inner London. Public transport coverage is lower and car ownership is higher in Outer London, with cars making up a larger share of journeys. In particular, people who live in Outer London are less likely to walk children to school, walk to see friends or relatives, and walk to pubs, restaurants and cinemas.

    In 2015:
    53 percent of Inner Londoners walked at least five journeys a week, compared to 35 percent of Outer Londoners
    47 percent of Inner Londoners walked as part of longer journeys on other forms of transport at least five times a week, compared to 41 percent of Outer Londoners

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  • Mayor's Transport Strategy

    Created by Simon Munk // 1 thread

    Draft Mayor's Transport Strategy 2017
    On June 21 Mayor of London, Sadiq Khan, published a draft of the Mayor's Transport Strategy. The document sets out the Mayor’s policies and proposals to reshape transport in London over the next 25 years.

    About the strategy

    Transport has the potential to shape London, from the streets Londoners live, work and spend time on, to the Tube, rail and bus services they use every day.

    By using the Healthy Streets Approach to prioritise human health and experience in planning the city, the Mayor wants to change London’s transport mix so the city works better for everyone.

    Three key themes are at the heart of the strategy.

    1. Healthy Streets and healthy people
    Creating streets and street networks that encourage walking, cycling and public transport use will reduce car dependency and the health problems it creates.

    2. A good public transport experience
    Public transport is the most efficient way for people to travel over distances that are too long to walk or cycle, and a shift from private car to public transport could dramatically reduce the number of vehicles on London’s streets.

    3. New homes and jobs
    More people than ever want to live and work in London. Planning the city around walking, cycling and public transport use will unlock growth in new areas and ensure that London grows in a way that benefits everyone.

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  • Kingsbury Road Proposed Public Realm Improvements Scheme

    Created by Simon Munk // 1 thread

    Brent council says:

    We are proposing to introduce a Public Realm Improvements Scheme in Kingsbury Town Centre between Kingsbury roundabout and Valley Drive as shown on the enclosed plan. The proposed scheme will include: A new 20 mph Zone, footway renewal, new Cycle lane, new parking and loading arrangements, new crossing facilities and new street furniture including trees, seats, benches and Cycle stands.

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  • Draft Golders Green Station Planning Brief

    Created by Simon Munk // 1 thread

    Barnet council says:

    Overview

    The council is consulting on the draft Golders Green Station Planning Brief which will help to shape any future development of Golders Green Bus Station and Underground Station, together with the adjoining depot, sidings and immediately surrounding public highways.

    We consider the site of Golders Green Station as an opportunity to provide a high quality mixed use development that sensitively integrates an improved public transport interchange within the distinctive historic environment of Golders Green.

    The Draft Planning Brief has been produced to ensure that any future development improves transport connectivity and land use integration, respects and enhances Golders Green, creates high quality public realm and supports the success and vibrancy of the town centre.

    The Draft Golders Green Station Planning Brief;

    Identifies development opportunities and constraints;
    Provides guidance;
    Sets out key planning policy considerations to establish a clear set of development parameters; and
    Outlines the council’s preferred approach to any future development.

    Why We Are Consulting

    We are consulting on the draft plans to redevelop the site and we want to hear the views of local people on the proposed developments. It is important that residents and other interested parties have their say in planning policy.

    Planning Briefs form a material consideration in the consideration of planning applications.

    The closing date for us to receive comments and feedback is Thursday 11 May 2017.

    The results will then be reported to the Council’s Policy and Resources Committee so that they can be taken into account when the final version of the Planning Brief is being considered for adoption.

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  • Finchley Central town centre strategy

    Created by Simon Munk // 1 thread

    Barnet council says:

    The Finchley Central Town Centre Project commenced in mid-2016 to generate a town centre plan for Finchley Central. This project aims to deliver a comprehensive strategy for the Town Centre to identify and enable future investment in the town centre.

    In order to develop this strategy, we have been involving residents, councillors and businesses in a number of community engagement exercises and consultations including but not limited to ‘Shaping Finchley’s Future’ in November 2016, ‘Hello, is it Finchley you are looking for’ a highsteet consultation base set up outside Tesco with local residents on the 17th and 21st September 2016 and a business survey conducted the Summer of 2016.

    At the Shaping Finchley’s Future event, a number of residents indicated that they would like to see this initial draft strategy in order to provide more in depth feedback. In response to this, we have made the draft strategy available here and are seeking feedback.

    The Town Centre Plan aims to:
    - establish civic centres and public spaces at the core of the high street.
    - support vital employment clusters as a key employment hub for the borough.
    - identify development growth opportunities within the Town Centre.
    - make the most of heritage assets by proposing high quality public realm improvements and reaffirming the historical identity of the area.
    - improve gateways through developments, focusing on the two station gateway points into Finchley Central.
    - ease pedestrian and cycle movement with long-term wider transport infrastructure improvements.
    - create an inclusive high street that serves both local residents and worker throughout the week whilst supporting the evenining and weekend economy.
    - establish a unique identity for the town centre which celebrates its unique charactre and asssets both historically and in present time.

    The strategy has been developed in the context of the council’s Entrepreneurial Barnet Strategy and the place-based commissioning approach, which focusses on joining up council services in order to provide a better overall experience for residents and businesses.

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  • A406 North Circular: Bridge Lane to Golders Green Road and Golders Green Road/Brent Street junction

    Created by Simon Munk // 1 thread

    Overview
    We are proposing improvements for pedestrians and cyclists along the A406 North Circular from Bridge Lane to Golders Green Road and at the A406 junction with Golders Green Road and Brent Street. The proposals include converting some sections of footway to shared use for pedestrian and cyclists, and a new staggered shared pedestrian/cycle ‘toucan’ crossing on the westbound carriageway, adjacent to the Woodlands retaining wall.
    The proposals for the crossing are in response to safety concerns that pedestrians are crossing the A406 independently and using the central reservation as a waiting area, rather than using the pedestrian footbridge located at the junction. The existing pedestrian footbridge will remain as a secondary crossing point for pedestrians and dismounted cyclists to use.

    We propose the following:
    - A new ‘toucan’ crossing for pedestrians and cyclists on the A406 North Circular westbound carriageway, adjacent to A406 Woodlands retaining wall. This would involve widening the central reservation by 4 metres to accommodate the crossing, central waiting area and guard railing, which in turn would require minor widening of the carriageway into the footway on the north west corner of the junction
    - New shared use footway for pedestrian and cyclists at the A406 junction with Golders Green Road and Brent Street. This would involve resurfacing the footways on three of the four corners of the junction to ensure surface consistency; we would also resurface the footway north of the junction to link to our current footway works at the Woodlands retaining wall. Signage and tactile paving would be used
    - Improve the shared use footway facilities from south of Bridge Lane to link to existing shared use facilities north of Courtleigh Gardens. This would involve resurfacing the footway to ensure surface consistency and adding new signage
    - Build a retaining wall to enable widening of the footway into the grass verge embankment just south of Bridge Lane
    - Widen the existing unsignalised crossing located across Golders Green Road to 3.2 metres to enhance facilities for the north/south movement
    - Introduce Advanced Stop Lines for cyclists on the Brent Street and Golders Green Road approaches

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